The Flag will go after Australia becomes a politicians’ republic, predicts leading TV personality, Ray Martin. 

In the meantime, the defence of the Australian Flag could not be in better hands than those of the Australian National Flag Association (ANFA). Their display of flags and their presentation at the Channel 9 60 minutes public meeting at the Leichhardt Town Hall last Monday was outstanding. John Vaughan’s and Bert Lanes’ superb addresses were summarised here.

The third ANFA speaker was entertainer Dianna Hammond. It was on her timely initiative that all in the Leichhardt Town Hall united in singing the National Anthem. Ms. Hammond, who has performed around the world, told us how distinctive and how loved our Flag is beyond these shores.

 

    

…most beautiful flag…

 This recalls those words of the great Labor leader, Dr. HV Evatt who said it is probably the most beautiful flag in the world.

How horrified he would have been when Kim Beazley announced the Keating government decision the flag would be changed before the Centenary of Federation.

 No government can now commit such a sacrilege. The Flag Act has been amended to require that the people must first approve any change in a vote in which  the present flag must be one of the choices available. I doubt that any government would dare try to amend that, and I would hope thta if they did the Senate would do the right thing.

     

…John Vaughan confronts Ray Martin…

     In the meantime, Katrina Adamski has reported in the North Shore Times (21/4)  on John Vaughan’s objections to the broadcast of the TV challenge to the Australian flag on Sunday 25 April 2010, which is  Anzac Day.

Mr Vaughan, who flies the Australian flag in his front yard, said he was “saddened and disgusted” at the offence it might cause servicemen and women.  Mr Vaughan accused Ray Martin and 60 Minutes producers of assembling a group of notable anti-Australian flag speakers for the debate.

“It is disappointing that Mr Martin does not appear to know the inspiring story of our flag,” Mr Vaughan said. “Thousands of Australians have fought for the freedom that we enjoy under this flag. Thousands of sporting stars have won medals as it was proudly flown and many dinky-di Aussies are immensely proud of our national flag."

“The Union Jack is but one element, acknowledging the historical fact that our system of parliamentary government and the rule of law are derived from our colonial heritage.  “Another element of the Southern Cross is highly significant in Aboriginal mythology.”  

   

Mr. Martin told Ms. Adamski that  he was stunned and surprised Mr Vaughan was being so hostile about the issue. He had attended a service every Anzac Day for 30 years and was involved with Vietnam veterans.

“But I don’t have to defend my credentials,” he said. “It’s my right to have an opinion and I can’t help thinking that Mr Vaughan is grandstanding."

 “Clearly, the national flag is the most powerful symbol of a country’s brand, but there has been great confusion between identifying the Australian, New Zealand and UK flags. Hold up the New Zealand flag – you can’t tell the difference."

 “Australians have fought under a whole range of flags – and the heavens didn’t fall when the Canadians changed their flag.”

It would be time for a change when Australia became a republic because the Union Jack would no longer be relevant, he said.