In between their military service, Prince William and Prince Harry plan to raise well half a million Australian dollars in a 1,000-mile eight day charity motorbike trek  from Durban to Port Elizabeth in South Africa. The money raised will go to Prince Harry's charity Sentebale, Unicef and the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund.

In the meantime a veritable platoon of republican politicians are lining up in Australia to ensure the taxpayer fund them in luxury for the remainder of their lives.  

And the world is up in arms about the greed demonstrated by too many in banking institutions and public companies.

They could learn much from the example of duty offered by the latest generation of our Royal Family.  

This is truly the time to be proud to be a constitutional monarchist.

While constitutional stability and security remain the most important considerations, even those who wish to remove the Crown must admit that the example the Royal Family sets is so often the one which should be followed. Prince William told the BBC the trip was a "mixture of adventure and charity", with money being raised for "three absolutely brilliant charities".

 "It's a great way of bringing all the three charities together and understanding the fact that Aids in Africa is still a major issue," he said.

 Prince William told the BBC on 18 October  they had not done any specific training for what is said to be  one of the most gruelling off-road bike routes. They will join 80 others in this ride. 

"We both ride bikes at the moment on the road, but on-road biking is nothing compared to this.  "All the off-roads stuff is up hills, down slopes across rivers, and it's all rocky and hilly, it's going to be fun," he said.

 Prince Harry added: "It's not just a bimble across the countryside that's for sure, it's going to be very challenging and [we are] expecting to fall off many a time, every day."

 His charity Sentebale, which helps disadvantaged children in Lesotho, especially Aids orphans, will receive around £100,000 from the event. 

 The Enduro group, which is organising the trek, has raised nearly £1m over the past three years for the charitable causes favoured by the princes.  

Prince Harry, an officer in the Household Cavalry regiment, said the princes were both looking forward to the challenge.  

"We never really spend any time together – we've got separate jobs going on at the moment.

 

"But it's great fun – well I don't know yet, we'll have to tell you. We might argue, we might have a bit of fun."

 Prince William joked: "The pain of spending a week with my brother is well worth it."

 "We're delighted that they're drawing attention to the work that we're all doing for children in South Africa," said Rachel Ward, from the Nelson Mandela children's fund.The princes previously joined forces to stage the Concert for Diana last year in memory of their mother.